Techniques

Eyelash Tinting

People often tint their lashes as a good alternative to mascara. The three colors that are most popular range from the lightest brown to the standard black to deepest blue-black.

Along with your brow shape, eyelashes help to define your eyes. Having a deep dark lash line can take your eyes from barely noticeable to defined. Here are a few tips you can use when tinting your client’s lashes.

Make sure the lashes are clean and makeup free. If using a makeup remover that is oil-based, make sure that any leftover residue is removed as well.

Prepping the area is key to providing a clean and error-free application. Prepare the area around the eye with Vaseline. Use a q-tip and swipe the Vaseline under and above the lash line, making sure to stay clear of the actual lashes. This created a barrier and prevents the lash dye from adhering to the skin.

Place a clean protective pad under the lower lash line. This covers the skin below. The client will then close their eyes and the application can begin.

I prefer using a plastic cuticle pusher to get as close as possible to the lash line. Once the tint is mixed, I then apply the product by pressing it into the lash line and sweeping it down the lashes. I start from the middle and work my way to the outer ends making sure the lashes are completely saturated. Check to make sure there is no dye on the skin. If there is, immediately use a q-tip to remove the product, as it will stain.

Make sure the client is in a comfortable position as they will be seated with their eyes closed for about twenty minutes. Once the time is up, I remove the cotton and then dampen 4×4s with warm water and gently swipe the lashes from the inside out until all the product is removed. I have the client look up and I gently swipe the lower lash line as well.

Hand your client a mirror to see the ending results. Ta da!

Extractions vs. Waxing

Lately, the girls and I—all current Alpha’s—have been discussing the “great debate.”

What do you find more personally satisfying, performing extractions or waxing?

Personally, I love popping zits: extractions.

There, I said it. You can think I’m weird, gross, and all sorts of other things. But I’m positive there is at least a 75% chance that you secretly enjoy picking at your skin. For those who don’t, and rely on your estheticians, don’t worry. I’m a professional (in training). I now know the correct way to unblock clogged pores by pressing lightly to release a comedone—and I know when to stop. For safety, I use sterile equipment, wear gloves, and clean the area with preventive products from Aveda.

I’m sure you’re wondering, “How can you find unclogging pores pleasurable?”

There’s science behind it! Many theories have been proposed as to why it can be pleasurable from primitive habits from our remote past to grooming as a sexual stimulant.

I favor the theory expounded by Helen Fisher, author of the bestselling book “Anatomy of Love: Mating, Marriage, and Why We Stray.” She explains that among hunter-gatherer societies, the brains and physiques of females are simply better at the fine motor-coordination necessary for good grooming, as well as certain other skills such as picking berries and making textiles. “In primate societies, females groom more than males: their children, their relatives and individuals that they are going to copulate with,” she says. “And they’ll do it for hours.”

If you are curious, you can read more at Salon.com—“In grossness and in health: Psycho-dermatology, female gorillas, and why women love to pick their boyfriends’ zits.

Extractions, to me at least, are very relaxing. But the other half of the Alpha ladies prefer performing waxing services for different reasons. So the debate continues—where do you stand?

Threading

Threading ProcedureThreading is an ancient method of hair removal. It originating in India and can be traced back over 6,000 years. It is one of the oldest methods of hair removal still practiced.

When shaping eyebrows, threading allows for a more precise shape. Rather than tweezing single hairs—or waxing clusters of hair—threading removes lines of hair at a time; this results in a crisper, defined line. Because it epilates hair at the follicle, threading is a longer-lasting method of hair removal. Threading is also completely sanitary. The only object which touches the skin is the thread itself, which is disposed of after each use.

The threading technique uses no chemicals, and the top layer of the skin is left untouched. This makes threading superior to waxing because it is safe to use on all clients—even those with rosacea, or those being treated with Retin-A or Accutane.

Because the threading procedure is safe for everyone, it has been growing rapidly in popularity. Now salons and spas everywhere are offering threading as a service to their clients.

Film Makeup of the Silent Era

One of the greatest inspirations for makeup artists is film history, be it the glamorous looks of the fifties or the more natural looks of the later 20th century.

When we look back to the silent era, makeup from the 1910s and early 1920s looks intensely dramatic and often ghoulish. You might think the makeup style of pale skin and dark and almost black lips and heavily-lined eyes from the silent films of the era had to do with accentuating facial expression and creating contrast, but it had more to do with technical limitations than it did creative choices. This is because the type of film used was orthochromatic, or blue-sensitive.

Orthochromatic film was used universally until 1922 and did not fall out of use completely until the 1930s. Blue colors registered as white on orthochromatic film, and red and yellow registered as black with varying shades of gray falling between those colors rather than indicating any degree of darkness or lightness in reality.

This created a unique and difficult challenge for film industry makeup artists of the day. They used heavily layered pink and white grease paint to get a reasonable skin tone. The eyes weren’t visible with this masklike foundation and blue-eyed actors weren’t even employed because their eyes would not register at all. Makeup artists used heavily applied red shadow around the eyes to make the eyes stand out. The signature look was completed with red lipstick which registered on film as black.

It made for an intensely dramatic face on film that looked almost nothing like what it looked like in real life. The film image though is what remains and still gives inspiration today.Greta Garbo

High Frequency

High frequency is a very useful, effective, and simple machine that is very beneficial to the client. When used properly, it can be used every day.

The machine consists of a glass electrode that can be used for different purposes. Within the electrode, there is neon or argon gas, and when turned on you can see the color of the gas and hear it. It has an oscillating current that is at a high frequency of over 10,000 Hz. — hence the name.

There are two ways the machine can be used: the direct or indirect method.

The direct method benefits the skin of acne prone clients by minimizing the population of the bacteria on the skin. The electrode is applied directly to the face using talcum powder or gauze to help with slip over the skin. It is most effective against papules — not whiteheads — because there is no chance of the possible spread of bacteria. This is done for about 5 minutes.

The indirect method is much more relaxing, and is more suitable for the mature or dehydrated client. The client holds the electrode while the therapist massages them. It is important to ensure that contact is not lost or else you could shock the client, which is the opposite of relaxing. This method is very stimulating to the skin without drying out or causing overstimulation.

Both of these methods can be done every day, as long as you don’t over stimulate the follicle which could be damaging rather than beneficial.

These machines are sold by themselves or as part of a multi-functional machine.

A Chip-free Manicure that Lasts

Even though gel manicures are becoming the new norm, many of us girls still prefer the basic manicure with all its flexibility. I like to be able to change my polish color more often than once every two to three weeks. Chips are inevitable. But with a basic non gel manicure, together with these tips, chips are more manageable.

We all know a manicure often won’t last a full week with our daily routines. Here are a few of my favorite ways to extend the life of my manicure and keep my polish looking fresh.

  • Keep nails short—by keeping a shorter nail length, you can prevent snags and tears from occurring. Even if you don’t have beautiful hands, a clean polished short nail can make all the difference.
  • Prep the nail—using a product to remove any oils from the nail bed is an essential step before applying polish. Removing all the oils from the nail bed will allow your polish to best adhere and helps ensure your polish doesn’t chip.
  • Apply a base coat—sometimes we think we can skip this step, but if you want to keep your nails from discoloring while also keeping the polish in place, a base coat is key. The product I favor is Sticky from CND.
  • Apply a top coat—a good and fast drying topcoat should always be the final step. This effort will create a sleek and shiny seal for your polish and keep your manicure from chipping. My go to product is Sech Vite.

Always remember that it is important to keep your hands and cuticles hydrated throughout the week. Solar Oil is my favorite all around great oil.

Basics of Highlighting and Contouring

How to Contour

Learn how to contour your face to create the illusion of perfect symmetry! Contouring and highlighting are makeup techniques used by nearly every makeup artist designed to bring light to certain features on your face while creating a shadow effect on others. The goal is to create an illusion with makeup that draws attention to specific areas while diminishing the look of others. Depending on your skin or preference, you can contour and highlight using creams, liquids, or powders. For highlight, you will want to use a shade lighter then your skin tone. For contour, you will use a shade darker then your skin tone. I prefer to always use a highlight color that has a little bit of shimmer to give a glow to the face. For contour, use a matte color for the perfect shadowing.

  • Cheeks

    I like to start with my contour to map out my face. Start by applying a darker shade to the hollows of your cheekbones from the hairline down the cheek about halfway and blend. If you have trouble finding the hollows of your cheeks, suck in cheeks like a fishy face and you will find the hollows. You can add as much dark color as needed but always start out light and build up. You can also bring the contour up the sides of the forehead near the hairline to create a smaller forehead. Apply highlight right above the contour on the tops of your cheekbones where light naturally hits the skin. When applying blush, concentrate on applying it to the apples of the cheeks.

  • Nose

    The nose can be a little bit tricky, but with more practice it looks amazing! Apply your contour color on each side of the bridge of your nose. I like to start the contour from the tip of my nose and bring it upward to ensure a straight line. Apply the highlight color down the very center of your nose.

    Tip: The more you blend, the more natural your contour will look!

  • Eyes

    When it comes to highlighting the eyes, apply highlight underneath the brow. That will help arch the brow and make it look clean. Also you can apply highlight color into the inner corners of the eyes for a more awake look.

Holiday Party Hairstyle

Holiday Hairstyle

To achieve this look, you should prep your hair with:

  • Pure Abundance Shampoo & Conditioner
  • Pure Abundance Style Prep
  • Volumizing Tonic
  • Phomollient Styling Foam

You’ll need these thermal styling tools:

  • Blow Dryer
  • Medium-sized Round Brush
  • Thermal Styling Iron/Wand

Use these products to add volume and texture:

  • Aveda Hair Potion
  • Aveda Air Control Hair Spray

Begin by spritzing towel-dried hair with the Pure Abundance Style prep, and then add the Phomollient Styling Foam and Volumizing Tonic. Work this into your hair so that everything is evenly saturated. Comb through the hair to ensure thorough saturation.

“Rough dry” the hair. This means to dry hair to about 80%. It sounds crazy, I know. But trust me, it makes styling much easier!

Section the hair into three to four equal horizontal parts. Begin in the lowest section on the back of the head and blow dry with the round brush. It’s okay if the curls you form aren’t perfect, as you can touch them up with a thermal tool later. Continue working this way up the head until all the hair is 100% dry.

After all the hair is dry, add Aveda Hair Potion to the root if more volume and texture is desired. Then section the hair again to begin adding finishing curls and waves. This is a deconstructed look; remember, it doesn’t have to look perfect; the messier, the better!

Section it one final time, into a half-up-half-down pony tail, and secure it with a hair tie. Use bobby pins if required. Finish the style with a little holiday ribbon tied in a bow, and enjoy yourself on your night out! You’ll look great!

The Power of Positive Energy and Intentions

One of the most important things I have learned while being in school is the power and importance of positive energy and intention.

I have always been a strong believer in the power of positive energy. I believe that if you stay positive in your thoughts and actions, good things will happen. However, I really was unfamiliar with what was meant by intention.

I first heard about intention from a massage therapist with whom I work. She said that if you always have good intentions during a massage, then your guest can only receive those positive intentions. But if your intentions are in the wrong place, they are almost guaranteed to be felt by your guest.

I heard this discussed again while in school and, by that point, I was really interested in trying it myself.

Now, I practice positive energy and intentions during every facial I perform. I like to spend a few moments before and after the treatment, with my hands touching my guest, either on their shoulders or on the sides of their head. I take a few deep breaths, and think to myself what I hope my guest will receive during their treatment, both physically and mentally. Maybe it’s glowing skin or the gift of relaxation. By just taking these few moments to pass along my energy to my guest, I have found that it really does result in a better experience.

There is nothing I love more than the feeling I get when someone is genuinely happy with the service I performed, and they leave feeling better than they did when they arrived.

Memorizing Facial Massages

Memorization can be one of the hardest things for some people, especially memorizing hand movements.

When I began learning to give facial massages, I thought, “Oh great. I’m only going to remember a few moves and forget the rest.” Thank goodness that our instructor allowed the video to run while we practiced the motions; it was a very soothing process. It wasn’t until a few weeks later, when she told us that she wasn’t showing the video anymore, that my heart stopped for a second. I thought, “Oh snap. I don’t know it!” I should have given myself more credit. To my surprise, I had remembered it. From that moment, I began to practice more. It shouldn’t just be in class; I highly recommend practicing at home.

I practice on my cat, Boo. Although it’s completely different, remembering the motions was the key to my success. Also, it was very amusing to watch my cat enjoy his personal massage while watching a movie.

Another form of practice is upon friends and family. If you have a very tight schedule, like I do, it can seem impossible to put the time aside to do this. I practice in the shower or on a small pillow. Making different fun learning environments can be better than always practicing on friends and family.

Working on learning through different avenues allows you a chance to become more adaptable and plays with your senses. It gives you a chance to become sensitive with your finger tips—playing with different textures and thus developing your senses. I find this beneficial because it allows me to become more detailed-orientated when I conduct skin analysis.

A Passion for Waxing

December 4, 2014
By

In addition to the passion for extracting sebum that I mentioned in my last blog entry, I have discovered a deep love for another type of extraction—hair! Yes, it turns out that I love waxing. Waxing everything from nostrils to navels, brows to buttocks. I guess I’m just an instant-gratification, conquistador-type chick.

To be honest, I thought waxing was something that would creep me out or even disgust me. But it turns out that I didn’t even know myself as well as I thought I did. It’s a blast.

This could also be because I’m a hairy gal myself. At least, I would be if I weren’t to wax. I’m like a little, hairy monkey. And I know how much I love a fresh wax. What’s more satisfying than going from legs that feel like scouring pads to legs that feel like a baby’s bottom? Not much, if you ask me. It’s right up there with creme brûlée … being fed to me by a certain man with the last name Elba. Yeah, it’s that good.

So why not bring that joy to others? If I can, for a second, make you feel like you’re yachting in the south of France with a bunch of supermodels at your every beck and call—why the heck not?

Natural Remedies

Some of the most cost effective and naturally beneficial skin care for all skin types can be made from ingredients you can typically find in your own pantry. Some of my favorites include:

Skin Care for Dry Skin

  • 1 banana, mashed
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • ¼ cup plain yogurt

Leave this combination on for 20 minutes and rinse with cool water.

A Firming Toner for Aging Skin

  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 2 cups purified water

Paint this mixture onto your face and neck and let dry.

A Calming Milk Mask for Rosacea or Red, Irritated Skin

  • Vitamin D milk
  • 2-3 drops rose oil, optional

Soaking a clean cloth the milk until fully saturated. Optionally, add in rose oil for added aroma and more calming effects. Wring out the cloth lightly, being careful not to remove too much of the milk. Lay the cloth over your face and let it sit for 10-15 minutes. Rinse your face with cool water.

Brightening for Oily Skin

  • ¼ teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • A few drops honey
  • ¼ cup plain yogurt
  • ½ a small lemon, juiced

Mix together the ingredients and leave on the skin for 15-20 minutes. Then rinse face with cool water.

Brightening for Dry Skin

  • ¼ teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • A few drops honey
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil, almond oil, or olive oil

Mix together the ingredients and leave on the skin for 15-20 minutes. Then rinse face with cool water.

A Gentle Exfoliant

  • ½ cup hot water
  • ⅓ cup oatmeal
  • 2 tablespoons plain yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1 small egg

Mix ingredients together. Apply a thin layer to the face with a brush, and let it sit for 10-15 minutes. Rinse with warm water, moving your hands in circular motions to gently exfoliate. Use this mask once a week to remove dead surface cells.

The History of Exfoliation

Exfoliation is the process of removing the dead skin cells from the surface of the skin through either chemical or mechanical methods.

Mechanical exfoliation, the process of exfoliating the skin by hand by scrubbing with something abrasive, has been practiced all over the world and throughout history. American Indians used dried corncobs. The people of the Comanche tribe would use sand from the bottom of a river bed to scrub the skin. Polynesian people would use crushed sea shells.

Mechanical exfoliation was practiced in ancient Egypt where they employed a variety of methods. Pumice stones were popular abrasives as well as other minerals such as alabaster particles, and scrubs made from sand and the aloe vera plant.

Exfoliation through chemical means, as practiced today, is a science constantly updated with new technology and ingredients. But the practice itself also has a long history dating back to ancient Egypt when sour milk, which contains lactic acid, was used as a chemical exfoliant. Cleopatra is famously said to have frequently bathed in it.

In the Middle Ages, people commonly used old wine for its exfoliation properties. Old wine was effective because of its tartaric acid content. Various natural remedies of these kinds, containing naturally occurring levels of alpha hydroxyl acids, were the norm until the late 1800s. That’s when German dermatologist Paul Gerson Unna began scientifically formulating the earliest forms of chemical peels. His pioneering research with salicylic acid is still used today.

In the early 20th century, dermatologists began to experiment with phenols in chemical exfoliation. That remained popular through most of the 20th century.

Natural Cleanser with a Twist

Your face is the first thing people see when they look at you. Whether you are forty, twenty four, or fourteen, you don’t want to walk around with acne on your face. I have pimples and blackheads sometimes, so I know that when someone looks at me, they are thinking: “Why didn’t you take care of that before you left the house?” But you’re not really supposed to pop pimples, and when pushing out blackheads, you should be sure to steam your face first for fifteen to twenty minutes.



I’m always reading up on new things, and lately I’ve run across this natural way to cleanse the face that’s especially good for people with super sensitive skin. First, I steam my face and take a cotton cloth to gently push the blackheads out of my face once I’m finished. Then I rinse my face with slightly cold water. (Using water that’s too cold isn’t good for your face. You’re trying to close the open pores on your face, but you shouldn’t shock and stun your pores with extra cold water.) Then I’ll take about one fourth cup lemon juice, a half teaspoon of baking soda, and about a nickel sized dollop of honey. I mix them all together and gently start to apply and massage into my face. After two to three minutes of massaging, I’ll rinse my face. Then I’ll blot my face with a towel that has a light color to make sure it’s properly cleansed. For toner, I use witch hazel which is the best natural toner out there. Then I’m done. 

This cleansing ritual also works really well for people with chest and back acne too.

I’m taking Biotin. It’s helped my hair grow, but it has also helped my face. I’m not as oily and, at the end of the day, my skin feels a lot better—it feels firmer, replenished, and hydrated.

Try this little home remedy for yourself and let me know what you think.

Lemon Mask Setup

Five Minute Makeup

We can all be a little busy sometimes or have no time at all for something as simple as putting on some makeup. This post will guide you through a quick and easy five minute makeup routine that you can even do in your car! It will just liven up your face a little bit and make you look ready to go for your day.

Here is all you’ll need:

  • Eye Brightener / Concealer
  • Volumizing Mascara
  • Brow Gel or Wax
  • Cream Blush
  • Bright Lipstick
  • Clear Lipgloss
  • Primers (optional)
  • Eyelash Curler (optional)
  • Concealer/Brightener

    Woman with triangle under eye showing where to apply the concealer.

    Hides dark circles, bags, blemishes, and adds life to skin.

    Apply a little of your eye brightener or concealer in areas you feel need a little coverage. For example: under your eyes, around the nose, blemishes, etc. Blend in with a clean finger; no brushes for this.

    Tip: Apply concealer in a triangle shape. It helps the illusion of flawless skin under eyes.

  • Curling Lashes

    Eyelashes Being Curled

    Lifts lifeless lashes and makes eyes look more “awake.”

    Curl your eyelashes in a pumping motion. Be gentle. You do not want to pull your lashes out.

  • Volumizing Mascara

    Eyelash Makeup Being Applied

    Helps define lashes and open up eyes.

    Apply a volumizing mascara to top and, if necessary, to bottom lashes.

    Tip: Apply in a zig zag motion starting at roots of lashes. Make sure you coat every lash evenly. Do not apply mascara to tips of lashes, it only weighs them down.

  • Brow Gel or Brow Wax

    Woman brushing her brows with gel or wax.

    Smoothes eyebrow hairs down and keeps them looking fresh.

    Brush through brows with your choice of gel or wax. No filling in this time because we have no time! Au naturel it is.

    Tip: Use a spooly to brush through if needed.

  • Bright Lipstick

    Lips with Bright Lipstick

    Adds color to the face and makes you look put together without trying.

    Apply lipstick in a dabbing motion.

    Optionally, add a clear gloss for some extra shine if needed.

    Tip: Make it look like you just bit into some berries and they stained your lips.

  • Cream Blush

    Cream Blush Applied to Face

    Gives a ‘dewy’ flush to the cheeks for a more natural looking complexion.

    Use fingertips to dab it on the apples of your cheeks and blend upward along cheekbones.

And there you have it, a look completed only in five minutes. Of course you may add your own twist on it if you feel you are missing a must have. I love putting this look to use on days when I have long errands to run or when I’m running around chasing kids as a Nanny. It’s perfect for one of those days and super basic. Anyone can pull this off.

Aromatherapy

November 13, 2014
By

Lavender FarmAromatherapy is form of alternative medicine using plant materials—especially aromatic plant oils—to enhance psychological and physical well-being. The essential oils are extracted from lowers, bark, stems, leaves, roots or other parts of a plant.

Once inhaled, the aroma from these essential oils is strongly believed to trigger certain brain functions. Essential oils are also absorbed through the skin; entering into the body through massage or application, they travel through the bloodstream and can promote a sense and feeling of whole-body healing.

As a form of alternative medicine, aromatherapy is now increasing in popularity. It is used for many different types of applications: pain relief, mood enhancement, and increased cognitive function. There are a wide number of essential oils available, each with its own healing properties.

As a massage therapist, I utilize aromatherapy with each of my clients. Once engaged with a client, and seeing what their needs are in their session, I will deduce which essential oil will best compliment their service. For example, if I have a client suffering from a lot of stress in their life, I will choose to use a lavender essential oil. It is well known for its sedative properties and for its ability to help calm stress and promote sleep. Ylang Ylang is another great essential oil to use in a massage setting for mood enhancement. Emotionally, it is helpful with stress, anxiety, depression, and to cope with anger. I like to use it to promote a sense of happiness and gratitude.

Bouncy Blowouts

Blowout with Big Curls

No great haircut is complete without a great blowout; the style truly is everything! Every cut has a blowout that suits it best. For example, a concave graduation looks great with a sleek smooth style, and a natural graduation, on curly hair, looks great with a diffused style.

Today, I’m doing a run-through of my favorite blowout for long, round layers.

Before I go into details, here is a list of all the products you will be using for this round brush blowout:

  • a round brush,
  • pure abundance prep,
  • phomollient, and
  • defining whip.

The end goal is a voluminous blowout with loose curls.

The first step is to add in your prep and the phomollient.

By the time you are ready to style your guest, their hair will be about 50% to 60% dry, so the second step is to rough-dry your guest’s hair until it is about 85% dry.

I like to section out a mohawk subsection and one subsection on either side of the head. In the back, I work my way up from the bottom, taking horizontal subsections. To achieve the look you want, make sure to create as much volume as possible when you get to the crown and the mohawk section. If your guest’s hair really doesn’t want to hold a curl, feel free to pin the curls in the mohawk as if you are doing a hard set.

Once the hair is completely dry and has the effect you want, take a dime-sized amount of the defining whip, rub the product in between your hands to warm it up so that it applies evenly, and apply it to the ends of your guest’s hair. This will give a piecey look and define the curls. If your guest likes a strong hold, you can finish off the look with a little bit of air control—it’s up to you!

Home Remedies for Dry Skin

October 15, 2014
By

Home Remedies for Dry Skin include Avocado

In this entry I will be discussing how to remedy dry skin at home. As the weather changes and we move into the winter months, I am sure we will all notice a change in our skin. When our bodies have trouble holding in the water and oil that it needs to keep skin moist, we end up with dry skin. One main reason you could have dry or scaly skin is due to low humidity. Heating and air conditioning can also contribute to dry skin.

  • Baking Soda

    A baking soda soak is a folk remedy to relieve itching and dry skin. Add one cup baking soda to a tub of hot water. Soak for 30 minutes and air dry.

  • Oatmeal

    Adding instant oatmeal to your bath will soothe your skin. The oats are packed with vitamin E, a nutrient vital to healthy skin.

  • Coconut Oil

    This can improve the moisture and lipid content of skin. Best applied after shower to lock in the moisture or add a spoonful to a bath for a 30 minute soak.

  • Avocado

    Since avocado is a natural emollient, it can hydrate and even prevent dry skin. You can use as a moisturizing mask one to two times a week. Mash half of the avocado and apply it directly to your face and body. If you are looking for more hydration, add a teaspoon of honey which will add moisturizing benefits to the skin.

  • Water

    Drink lots of water. It helps to keep your body hydrated and can alleviate dry skin. Eight to ten glasses daily is the minimum quantity, but it is ideal to drink more!

Body Machines: CoolSculpting

October 1, 2014
By

Triptych of midsection showing before and after of CoolSculptingCoolSculpting, approved by the FDA in 2010, is a non-invasive fat reduction technique, sometimes considered a nonsurgical alternative to liposuction. The technology uses a medical treatment process called Cryolipolysis. Fat cells are destroyed by controlled cooling which then, in turn, reshapes the contours of the body. The cooling process is to cause cell death of subcutaneous fat tissue without damaging the outer layer of skin. In the weeks that follow, once the process is complete, those dead fat cells are naturally eliminated from the body. Lipids from the fat cells are slowly released and transported by the lymphatic system to be processed and eliminated, much like that of fat from food.

Undergoing this service is quite simple. The client is seated in a treatment chair and the technician will place a cold get pad across the area to protect the skin. There is an applicator cup that is positioned by the technician and then a gentle vacuum pressure is applied to draw the tissue between the cooling panels on the applicator. The applicator stays on the treatment area for one hour. Once that is completed the technician will then massage the area to break-up the fat. The client can return to their normal routine post treatment. Some average responses to the procedure are redness, swelling, some numbness, mild cramping, and possible bruising. On average about 20-25% of the fat cells will be eliminated within that one hour service. A technician would design a treatment plan tailored to each individual’s desired results.

Acne

September 27, 2014
By

Acne before and after

Acne can affect you in many ways, both emotionally and physically. I myself have gone through the troubles and frustrations that acne can bring. I’m going to explain the different types of acne and how to help your skin heal, as well as give some tips for prevention.

Acne has four grades of severity:

  • Grade I—Minor breakouts, minimal comedones (black heads), a few papules (pimples).
  • Grade II—Many comedones, and occasional papules and pustules.
  • Grade III—Red and inflamed, many comedones, papules, and pustules. Better to get treated by a dermatologist.
  • Grade IV—Cystic acne. Cysts with comedones, papules, pustules, and inflammation are present. There is a higher risk of scarring and deep pitting. This grade of acne can only be treated by a dermatologist.

There are many ways to help with the symptoms and treatment of acne. It’s very helpful to keep your skin clean and have a good skin regimen. Facials are recommended once a month or as needed. A healthy diet is also good to keep in mind. Use products that are noncomedogenic. Avoid too much sun exposure and it can also help to reduce stress. And don’t pick your blemishes. Not only will you prevent the infection from spreading, but you will reduce the chances of scarring, and you’ll decrease the healing time.

Acne is a constant battle but if you take the right measures in keeping your skin clean and hydrated with the right products you can definitely win the fight.