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Threading

Threading ProcedureThreading is an ancient method of hair removal. It originating in India and can be traced back over 6,000 years. It is one of the oldest methods of hair removal still practiced.

When shaping eyebrows, threading allows for a more precise shape. Rather than tweezing single hairs—or waxing clusters of hair—threading removes lines of hair at a time; this results in a crisper, defined line. Because it epilates hair at the follicle, threading is a longer-lasting method of hair removal. Threading is also completely sanitary. The only object which touches the skin is the thread itself, which is disposed of after each use.

The threading technique uses no chemicals, and the top layer of the skin is left untouched. This makes threading superior to waxing because it is safe to use on all clients—even those with rosacea, or those being treated with Retin-A or Accutane.

Because the threading procedure is safe for everyone, it has been growing rapidly in popularity. Now salons and spas everywhere are offering threading as a service to their clients.

Spotlight on Acne Spot-treating

Honey

I’ve personally suffered from acne all of my life, from cystic to hormonal, stress-caused, and everything in between. Since a young age, I have always required rather harsh treatments that have been potentially caustic both to my skin and internally as well. I have always looked for ways to treat my breakouts between visits to my esthetician. While searching for a more holistic approach to treating my acne, I have come across a few spot treatments that are safe to use on a daily basis.

Raw honey contains high antibacterial and antimicrobial properties, which helps to reduce bacteria within and around a breakout. To use, swab a small amount of raw honey onto a cotton q-tip, and press it onto your blemish. Leave the raw honey on for 15 minutes, and then rinse with cool water. Repeat this process for a few days, or until noticeable results occur.

Aspirin is great for large, painful cystic acne. The chemical composition of aspirin is very similar to that of salicylic acid, a very common topical treatment for acne. Using aspirin topically to treat acne also reduces swelling and redness that accompany a breakout. Crumble one aspirin tablet, and add in a few drops of purified water until you’ve created a paste-like consistency. Swab a small amount onto a cotton q-tip, and press it onto your blemish; leaving it on for 10 minutes. Rinse off the aspirin paste with cool water, and re-apply this mixture each morning and night until signs of your breakout subside.

Beauty Behind Ice

Freeze your flaws away by trying out an ice facial treatment. Ice can be used to treat a wide variety of skin conditions from blemished to aging, and it can be done simply from home. Depending on what you’re looking to treat, ice can provide some major benefits.

  • For blemished skin—Hold an ice cube directly on a problem area to reduce inflammation, and alleviate pain from deep, cystic acne. Wrap an ice cube in a plastic bag, and hold it onto the blemish for 10-15 minutes for results.
  • For tired eyes—wrap an ice cube inside a clean wash cloth and hold over your eyes for 10-15 minutes to reduce swelling—or “bags” under your eyes. For a more powerful effect, brew caffeinated tea and freeze it into cubes, following the same instructions.
  • For dry/flaky skin—Create an icy scrub which will produce an awakening, cooling effect that’s perfect for mornings. Combine a few ice cubes with a few pieces of papaya into a blender to make your exfoliant. The ice pieces act as a mechanical exfoliant, while the natural enzymes in the papaya will act as a chemical exfoliant, to help further smooth the texture of your skin.

Ice cubes held to female face.

Natural Remedies

Some of the most cost effective and naturally beneficial skin care for all skin types can be made from ingredients you can typically find in your own pantry. Some of my favorites include:

Skin Care for Dry Skin

  • 1 banana, mashed
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • ¼ cup plain yogurt

Leave this combination on for 20 minutes and rinse with cool water.

A Firming Toner for Aging Skin

  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 2 cups purified water

Paint this mixture onto your face and neck and let dry.

A Calming Milk Mask for Rosacea or Red, Irritated Skin

  • Vitamin D milk
  • 2-3 drops rose oil, optional

Soaking a clean cloth the milk until fully saturated. Optionally, add in rose oil for added aroma and more calming effects. Wring out the cloth lightly, being careful not to remove too much of the milk. Lay the cloth over your face and let it sit for 10-15 minutes. Rinse your face with cool water.

Brightening for Oily Skin

  • ¼ teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • A few drops honey
  • ¼ cup plain yogurt
  • ½ a small lemon, juiced

Mix together the ingredients and leave on the skin for 15-20 minutes. Then rinse face with cool water.

Brightening for Dry Skin

  • ¼ teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • A few drops honey
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil, almond oil, or olive oil

Mix together the ingredients and leave on the skin for 15-20 minutes. Then rinse face with cool water.

A Gentle Exfoliant

  • ½ cup hot water
  • ⅓ cup oatmeal
  • 2 tablespoons plain yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1 small egg

Mix ingredients together. Apply a thin layer to the face with a brush, and let it sit for 10-15 minutes. Rinse with warm water, moving your hands in circular motions to gently exfoliate. Use this mask once a week to remove dead surface cells.

Box Color vs. Salon Color

As professional colorists, we often struggle with getting certain clients to make the switch from box color to professional salon color. Most self-coloring clients settle for box color because “it gets the job done.” But why settle for less? Truly beautiful hair color results come out of a salon, not a drugstore. Here are a few top reasons why you shouldn’t resort to box color:

  • Can’t be customized—you pick a shade, and that’s what you get (maybe).
  • Never guaranteed—box color was formulated to alter a wide range of hair types, and hair colors. Generally included in universal box colors is a 12% or higher percentage developer; however, not everyone requires that much peroxide. In fact, most people require a lower percentage developer to color their hair, resulting in a healthier, truer end result. Where you’re starting from level-wise plays a huge role in determining your outcome.
  • Difficult to buy—not enough people realize the difference between permanent, demi-permanent, semi-permanent, and temporary hair colors when shopping for themselves. You could wind up buying the completely wrong product.
  • Harmful to the hair—box colors are designed to deliver quick, “easy” results. When formulated, they often use harsh chemicals and fillers to “get the job done” and are not designed to condition the hair.

The list goes on. Treat yourself to a color service from a professional at a salon, and experience the difference for yourself! Nothing beats a professional color application.

Home Hair Color

Product Review: Aveda Dry Remedy Oil

Aveda’s new Dry Remedy Oil quickly became a must-have product in my professional hairstyling kit. I find myself using it on every guest during their service as it’s one of those incredible products that can benefit everybody’s hair type.

Dry Remedy Oil, 99.9% naturally derived, offers weightless shine and maximum condition to the hair without leaving a heavy, greasy finish like most other oils on the market. Other oils often contain silicones which makes a serum-like product. Those form a heavier type of styling aid, and can build up in the hair, weighing it down and leaving a greasy finish.

But because of the way Dry Remedy Oil is formulated, it offers great versatility. With any texture hair—even fine—I will add a few drops prior to styling, and then finish with a few drops for maximum softness and shine. This product is one of my secret weapons. Show a client how they can use it in their dry hair and they’re immediately hooked.

The benefits are real. It instantly adds up to 41% more moisture to the hair with its buriti oil. It also deeply penetrates the cuticle, and seals down any frizz or fly-aways. To demonstrate the full advantage of the oil, I like to apply the oil only to one side of their hair and then allow them to compare both sides. Sometimes guests have a hard time wrapping their head around why a stylist is telling them to add a new product to their routine. But offering a lesson on how to use it, and showing them the physical changes in their hair, ends up changing their mind.

Aveda Dry Remedy Oil

Nutritious Hair

Combing Damaged Hair
Everybody desires naturally healthy, strong, luminous hair. Why rely on endless searching for a costly “miracle product” to restore your hair, when you can find the answers you’re looking for in the foods you eat?

One of a stylist’s best-kept secrets to healthy hair isn’t which high-end product they squeeze from a tube; but rather a well-balanced diet. With the appropriate amounts of protein, iron, and other key nutrients found in the foods we eat, we can actually treat the overall health and appearance of our hair from a much deeper standpoint—from the inside out.

Magnesium, vitamins B, C, D, E and, most importantly, proteins and iron, are necessary to maintain healthy hair. Learning how to work these elements into your daily diet to coexist with your personal lifestyle will, over time, result in the reconstruction of your hair.

Non-Vegetarians: The best source for protein and iron will be in lean meats such as pork, beef, and fish.

Vegetarians: Non-animal sources for protein and iron include spinach, soybeans, lentils, and cereals containing iron.

As much as well-balanced diets create the condition for healthy hair, poor diets can cause poor hair. Malnourishment, which is generally the result of low-caloric intake from a restrictive diet, can cause dry, brittle, dull hair. “Crash diets” can lead to hair loss due to an insufficient intake of necessary nutrients. Cigarette smoking—and the nicotine in them—also affects hair-health. Nicotine affects the body’s circulatory system; if the scalp doesn’t have a sufficient blood supply, hair growth can be inhibited.

The Power of a Haircut

“A woman who cuts her hair is about to change her life.”Coco Chanel


Sometimes the importance of a haircut goes beyond just necessity. Although in a salon, we maintain our clientele by keeping them on a schedule for trims and touch-ups, every now and then you will have guests in your chair relying upon your haircut to change their lives. 


Women often hold onto their hair as a “security blanket”; maybe they’ve always had long hair and that’s all they’ve ever known; or maybe they feel that it’s more feminine to keep their length. Whatever the case, never underestimate the power you have as a stylist to not only change a guest’s physical look, but to also change a guest’s lifestyle.

Too many times, I’ve walked a guest with long hair back to my chair and spoke the phrase: “So tell me a little bit about your hair, and what you’re looking to have done today.” I’ve expected, “Oh, just a trim.” But always expect the unexpected. Transformations such as these—from a simple long layered haircut to a drastically shorter haircut—are what keeps me inspired as a stylist. More than likely, there’s an important reason behind the guest’s decision as to why they’re “making the chop”; I believe that half the fun of the service is being the person responsible for their new outlook. 


I’m sure any stylist would agree: doing a “big reveal” and observing your client’s expression has to be one of the most rewarding feelings you can experience in this industry. I encourage everyone not to overlook their appointments, and remember the impact that your service has on your guests!A woman with long hair gets a new hairstyle in three images.