The Difference Between UVB and UVA Rays and Their Affects on your Skin

One of the biggest misconceptions about sunscreen is that it is only for the pool or beach. In fact a lot of you adults don’t incorporate it in their beauty regimen at all. The number one reason for again is from sun damage and it’s much easier to prevent now then correct the later.

People think that if they aren’t in direct sunlight then they don’t need to apply sunblock for the day. Unfortunately what they don’t understand is that we are exposed to sun rays directly and indirectly. Sun rays can reach you driving in your car, sitting inside work, or anywhere there can be windows.

Here are some facts about the sun rays:

There are both UVA and UVB that we are exposed to daily. UVA rays are called the “Aging Rays”. They are constantly present, no matter the season or the weather. If you think you can’t get sun damage on a cloudy day then think again. They are so powerful that they also penetrate some clothing and even glass.

Also UVA rays are the rays responsible for the signs of aging because they are able to penetrate much deeper into the surface of the skin, damaging the cells beneath. While people think their skin looks younger when it’s tan, the reality is each tan gives your skin irreversible damage, and you will see its damage later in life. When you think of UVA rays, think sun spots, leather skin and wrinkles!

UVB rays are the rays you can blame when you get a sunburn. Unlike UVA rays, these rays aren’t always the same strength year round. They are more prevalent in the summer months; however they are able to reflect off water or snow so it’s always important to protect yourself. UVB rays are responsible for causing most skin cancers.

Do yourself a favor and start protecting yourself with the proper sunscreen. People always think the higher the sunscreen number, the more protection they have, but that isn’t always the case. It’s good to choose a broad-spectrum sunscreen of 30 SPF that contains both UVA and UVB protection. UVA radiation is less powerful than UVB, but it penetrates deeper into the skin. Small daily doses of UVA causes long-term skin injury, even without signs of sunburn. UVA light is used in tanning booths.

Choosing to use a protection every day is the single most important thing you can do to prevent sun damage and skin cancer.