Use Your Lymphatic System to Reduce Cellulite

Female Lymphatic SystemCellulite is a particularly unattractive disorder of the subcutaneous tissue. Typically, it is caused from an excess of toxins stored in the fatty tissue. It presents as a rippling or cottage cheese appearance typically in the thighs and buttocks and can be difficult to get rid of. Women are especially prone to cellulite because we store more fat; it can be seen on even the thinnest of women.

For ladies who seek to improve the appearance of stubborn cellulite, it’s all about harnessing the power of your lymphatic system.

First, good old fashioned cardiovascular activity is a great way to get the lymphatic system moving in order to move those toxins out of your body. Running is an excellent way to accomplish this; it gets your heart rate up high enough to increase circulation, thereby increasing the movement of lymph. Any time you’re raising your heart rate and doing cardio exercises, you are helping to reduce the appearance of cellulite.

Another approach is through massage therapy. Having a Swedish massage helps to drain toxins and move the lymph–which carries fat–out of your system. If you are fortunate enough to receive massage on a regular basis, it can tone muscles as well as remove toxins that are sitting below the skin. Not only is massage relaxing and beneficial to the nervous system and muscular tissue, but it is a healthy way to eliminate waste products in the body. Be sure to drink plenty of water following a massage in order to expedite the removal of wastes.

A third way to improve the appearance of cellulite is via dry brushing. Dry brushing uses a brush or gloves on dry skin in light sweeping motions to help the lymphatic system to do its job. Start on the legs or arms and always brush towards the heart. This practice can be done daily, and is a beneficial practice for anyone looking to detoxify.

Fruity Face Masks

Woman with Avocado Face Mask

Here are a few easy face masks you can make with just a few things you most likely already have in your kitchen. All you need is a few fruits and veggies and, for the last three, a blender. These starter masks are all pretty much good for any skin type, So get creative and find the one that fits your needs best!

  • Avocado Mash: mash ½ of a ripe avocado with 2 tablespoons of honey and apply to the face. Leave on skin for around 20 minutes and rinse off
  • Banana and Honey Mask: Mash one banana with 1 tablespoon of honey and mix until it forms a smooth paste. Apply to face and set for 10-15 minutes. Rinse off.
  • Milk and Honey Mask: Mix together plain yogurt and honey. Put it on your face and let it sit for about 20 minutes.
  • Pumpkin Pie: In a blender, combine 2 cups canned pumpkin, 4 tablespoons low-fat vanilla yogurt, and 4 tablespoons of honey. Apply to face and leave on for 10 minutes, then rinse off.
  • Berry Blitz: In a blender, combine ½ cup frozen or fresh berry mix (strawberries, blueberries, or raspberries or all three). Add ½ cup plain yogurt and 1 tablespoon of honey. You can drink the rest or double the ingredients for a full on smoothie and face mask mix.
  • Cucumber mask: In a blender, blend one peeled cucumber until it has a jelly-like consistency. Apply to skin for around 15—20 mins and rinse off. This one is best if applied when cold.

Facial Process

Getting a Facial

A facial is not necessarily something that someone has to have to live. Rather, it’s a gift—to oneself or to others. It is like having a spa day or treating yourself to some relaxation.

As an esthetician, I know that performing a facial is very precise and has many small details to which you need to attend. It is important to follow each step by step procedure and make sure the facial is relaxing, yet beneficial as well. Some components of a facial include cleansing, a refinement, steaming, massage, a masque, a skin analysis, etc. Missing any of the steps can result in an incomplete service and a sub-optimum result.

For a basic one hour facial, the esthetician’s step by step process goes as follows:

  1. Opening ritual: Begin the facial with some calming inhales and slow exhales to relax the client in a calm setting. Offer them a calming essential oil that will remind them of something they can relate to in a positive way. They should be very relaxed before starting the facial.
  2. Cleansing: Cleanse the skin with an appropriate cleanser based on the consultation with the client. The skin has yet to be analyzed, so the cleanser has to be picked based on what you know their skin can tolerate.
  3. Analyze: After toning, analyze the skin with a magnifying lamp and determine their skin type, temperature, tone, dehydration level, and any other concern they have or you see.
  4. Refine: After determining what needs to be addressed, decide on a choice of products and determine which refinement and masque to use during the facial. Apply the refinement for seven to ten minutes depending on the client’s skin condition.
  5. Massage: After removing the refinement and toning the skin, move into the massage. Start from the décolleté up to the neck, from the bottom of the face and then upwards. It is important to use enough oil to smoothly move your fingers but to not slip across the skin.
  6. Masque: The masque is one of the most important parts of a facial. This is usually something that complements the refinement done or help to heal any extractions or intense work performed on the face. This also lasts after application for seven to ten minutes.
  7. Closing ritual: When the facial has come to an end, help the client adjust back out of relaxation and provide them with some stretches and movements to help them get ready to leave.
  8. Finishing touch: Before your client leaves, a nice thing you can do is provide a minimal makeup touch up. Offer them a quick lip, mascara, blush, etc. They will appreciate the offer and will remember the gesture.

Success Spotlight: How Rocky Boyle Turned a Cosmetology Dream into Reality

June 14, 2017
By

Portrait - Rocky Boyle

Starting a new career can be scary or intimidating, but the opportunities far outweigh the risk. In the beauty and fashion industry, the sky is the limit and, with the right mindset, hard work, and passion for the craft, dreams can come true.

At the Cinta Aveda Institute, we firmly believe that our students have all the opportunity in the world, and if they follow the process, they will succeed. We love hearing success stories and how people have achieved their dreams, so we sat down with Rocky Boyle, Mentor Stylist at Cinta Salon to find out what inspires and drives her.

What made you decide to go to cosmetology school?

My inspiration for school was my mother’s best friend. We used to hang out in her salon all of the time in my hometown.

Where did you go to school?

I went to Miss Marty’s School of Beauty & Hairstyling here in San Francisco. Beauty school was something I had always wanted to do but, in my twenties, I was too immature and more worries about having a good time. So, when I moved to San Francisco, I cleaned up my act and decided I wanted something better for my life. My husband and I bought our condo around the corner from Miss Marty’s, so I took this as a sign! At that point, I was now 30 and felt ready to take on the responsibility to pursue a career as a hair stylist. I enrolled within the month and off I went.

Do/did you have any mentors or important people who have had a hand in your success?

While in cosmetology school, I met my mentor and hero, Cinta Gibbons. She was very generous with advice on how to pick the right salon for you. Cinta advised to intern at as many places you can and ask many questions about the assisting program.

One thing she said that always resonated with me was, “There is a salon for everyone, and not everyone is right for every salon. Choose wisely where you train because it will set the foundation of the stylist you’re going to be.”

What were some of your assistant jobs?

Of course, I ran straight to Cinta Salon as soon as I received my license. I assisted for about 2 years before becoming a Stylist. I know it seems like a long, huge time investment, but it was the best investment that I have ever made in my future. Assisting teaches you the technical skills, timing, and culture of the salon, which helps you decide if it’s the right place to pursue your career. I highly recommend it!

What do you think has made you successful?

After all the training and 11 years at Cinta Salon, I love that I get to pass what I have learned to the newcomers while focusing on being the best hairstylist that I can be.

I definitely attribute my accomplishments to education. Any time you have the opportunity to take classes, do it! It is one of my favorite things about our industry. Whether I get to be a teacher or be the student I feel we owe it to our guests to always put our best foot forward.

Everything I have learned to this point I owe to my own mentors, Arvin, Sara, Jackie, Dympna, and, of course, Cinta. Thank you for making me the stylist and person I am today.

What advice do you have for students who are looking to move up in the beauty industry?

My best piece of advice to not just aspiring professionals, but to all stylists: Education, education, education! Be a sponge and soak it all in—you’ll never regret having more knowledge.

Treating Keratosis Pilaris

Arm with Keratosis PilarisEveryone wants smooth, healthy skin. If you’re bothered by pesky little bumps that feel rough to the touch, you’re not alone. Those bumps might be keratosis pilaris — check with your doctor or dermatologist to be sure. While the bumps are harmless and painless, they can be difficult to treat.

This condition is common in children and young adults and can sometimes resolve itself by early adulthood. It is important to have a skin specialist or dermatologist examine your skin to make a concise diagnosis.

If you run your hand along the back of your arm and it has a bumpy or rough texture, you could have keratosis pilaris. The bumps are often in patches and can resemble a “goose-like flesh” or “chicken skin”. They appear white and are somewhat hard to notice from a quick glance. They are most commonly found on the back of your arms, although they can also be found on the cheeks, thighs, and buttocks. They can become red, but are not painful, and are generally not itchy or cause any kind of discomfort.

These bumps can also become inflamed, and can scar if they are picked at or scratched. Keratosis pilaris is caused from the build-up of keratin under the skin’s surface. The keratin develops a scaly plug that blocks the hair follicle at the opening. The result is bumpy skin.

If you have keratosis pilaris, you want to know how to get rid of the problem. While keratosis pilaris is not curable, you can lessen the appearance and signs. It can be challenging to treat, but you can usually reduce the appearance of the bumps and redness over time.

A topical retinoid therapy using Vitamin A can promote cell turnover and keep the follicle from getting plugged. A topical exfoliant or medicated cream containing alpha-hydroxy acids and moisturizers can soften the dried out skin and remove dead skin cells. Green tea also helps reduce the visible redness and bumps associated with irritated dry skin and keratosis pilaris.

Being consistent with your skin care will help keep your keratosis pilaris under control and replenish a smooth skin finish. Before trying medical grade products to treat this skin disorder, I would definitely recommend trying just a simple exfoliating scrub; this alone can do wonders for your skin tone and texture.

When using an exfoliating scrub, apply generously to the affected area and rub in with your hands in an upward motion to slough away dead skins cells more effectively. Do this one to two times weekly and apply a moisturizer after to keep the skin hydrated.

Hair of Your Dreams

Mermaid Hair

Mermaid hair, Beta Fish Hair, Unicorn Hair…Whatever you call it, it’s dreamy and it’s happening now.

The pastel hair trend definitely rules the roost now and you can get involved with some of Aveda’s high lift colors or enlightener. It’s a commitment, but it’s glorious to be able to see your hair go from natural to fanciful.

There’s nothing new about crazy hair colors but now it’s become a lot more prevalent and a lot softer in hue. These soft shades are achievable when your hair has been lightened enough. They look great with long or short hair.

Shades like lavender are insanely easy to maintain with Aveda’s pigmented shampoos and conditioners. So, if you’ve already taken the plunge and want to return the technicolor to your tresses, try Blue Malva Shampoo and Conditioner. It adds a silvery, cool hue back to hair that’s become brassy or lost its luster. The shampoo is gentle and suitable for all hair types and the conditioner deep conditions hair.

If you’re going for a big change to your hair, why not make it of the mythical variety?

Embrace What’s Yours

Curly Hair

For the past six years, I have been altering my curl pattern: keratin, Brazilian blow out, and at home relaxers. At the time it was all great. I was getting those long beach waves I’d seen in Allure or Vogue. I felt like I needed to be something I wasn’t in order to “fit in” and feel sexy and confident.

When you’re in middle school, your body is awkwardly changing, your face doesn’t fit the rest of the picture, you have braces, and your curly hair just doesn’t cut it. Throughout high school, I styled my hair constantly. I saw the curl permanently change from beautiful tight ringlets to looser and looser curls, eventually turning into awkwardly straight/curly hair.

I didn’t understand how beautiful my old curls were.

Since attending Cinta Aveda, I’ve been trying to transition to my old curls again, returning to my roots. With all these style gurus around me, I got to ask them a million questions about how to get a curl back again!

I’ve been emptying my pockets on products for my poor hair, and I’ve finally found a certain routine that gets them to ringlet again. They are coming back to life!

Yes, there are days when I feel like I want to flat iron my hair, making it picture perfect and obtaining a certain look. But mostly, I feel like myself again–fully myself.

As a word of advice, embrace what’s yours.

Skin Foods

StrawberriesBeing in the Esthetics program, my focus is on skin care. We spend many hours learning about the skin on different levels. We study skin diseases and disorders. We study the various types of skin based on hydration, or lack thereof. We spend a lot of time learning about ingredients and products to put topically on the skin to address and balance each person’s unique issues.

It’s also very important to treat the skin from the inside out. It’s important for the skin to drink plenty of water to stay hydrated. But what are good foods and herbs that can enhance and beautify the skin?

Certain foods have powerhouse ingredients that keeps the skin supple and smooth and help to fight age related damage.

Per serving, strawberries have more anti-aging vitamin C than oranges or grapefruit. Research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition shows that people who eat foods rich in Vitamin C have fewer wrinkles and less age related dry skin than those who don’t. Vitamin C fights free radicals, which damage cells and breaks down collagen, leading to fine lines. You can also apply a berry mask for smoother, more hydrated skin.

Olive oil is another powerhouse for the skin. It has antioxidant and anti inflammatory properties. You can use it topically to soften skin and create more radiance. It is also wonderful as a lipgloss or for rough patches of skin that may occur on the elbows or knees.

Another excellent addition to the diet is green tea. It is filled with antioxidants. There are studies that show drinking green tea may reduce your risk of skin cancer. Green tea contains tannins which act as an astringent. When applied to the skin it can reduce puffiness. You can use this feature of green tea on your eyes: chill damp tea bags in the fridge and put on eyes for 10 to 15 minutes.

Stay aware of what we put both in and on your body.

Coconuts: Who Knew?

Coconuts in TreeLiving in the Philippines, coconuts were plentiful and not really out of the ordinary. We drank the milk and ate the meat: we drank coconut water straight from the young coconuts, most of our desserts had coconut. The women in my family used the oil as a hair treatment. Even so, I didn’t realize all of the health benefits one can get from a coconut until the coconut craze began a few years ago here on the western part of the world. Now, I’m seeing many different brands of coconut water, and reading all these articles about coconut oil. It seems that the world has discovered coconuts.

Coconuts are a great source of antioxidants and they have antibacterial properties. They can fight infections, lower cholesterol, aid in weight loss, and support the development of strong bones. And these are only a few of their many wonderful benefits.

Coconut water is one of the more popular coconut products. It’s a refreshing drink that contains electrolytes. When purchasing coconut water, make sure it comes from organic young coconuts, is not heat pasteurized, and does not come from concentrate. My favorite brand is Harmless Harvest.

Coconut oil is another great way to enjoy the benefits of coconuts. It can be used for cooking, removing makeup, and as a moisturizer. There is still ongoing debate about whether it is good or bad for consumption due to the amount of saturated fat it contains. Look for an organic brand.

Coconut flour is also available and is a great substitute for regular flour for those with a gluten intolerance and is also a good source of fiber.

And, of course, they’re delicious.

Haircare for Chemically Treated Hair

Woman with Chemically Treated Hair

After-treatment care is crucial for lightened hair. Let’s face it, breakage is a nightmare. The texture of highlighted or lightened hair may feel dry and like hair.

Here are some tips for keeping your locks luscious and healthy after a chemical process:

  • Shampoo less

    Shampooing less can sound scary. But every day shampooing can strip your hair of natural oils leaving your hair dry and even turn your ashy or golden locks brassy. Try to shampoo every other day, use a dry shampoo, or just condition and skip the shampoo. You can put your hair in a bun or a ponytail on the days you don’t wash it.

  • Hair Masks

    Use a hair mask treatment at least once a week. This type of treatment will restore proteins in the hair. Furthermore, your hair will feel softer and not as dry.

  • Deep Conditioning Treatment

    Most salons offer professional deep conditioning treatments. Usually, you can do them once a month. They are more concentrated than your at home hair mask.

  • Use Fewer Hot Tools

    Skip the blow dryer and try air drying. If you’re going to use a flat iron or a curling wand, apply a heat protectant beforehand to minimize heat damage.