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Straight Razor Shaving

Straight Razor

The one thing that barbers are allowed to use that cosmetologist cannot is a straight razor. Straight razor shaving is usually only done in barber shops. You can use the straight razor for cleaning up around the neck, doing line ups, face shaving and beard line ups. In traditional high end salons, you are not allowed to use clippers, let alone a shaver.

How to straight razor shave the Aveda way:

  1. Apply hot towel over the face.
  2. Massage face with All Sensitive Oil.
  3. Apply Aveda Shaving Cream over the oil.
  4. Apply another hot towel.
  5. Apply hot lather all over the face.
  6. Begin your shave going with the grain. Use another hot towel and apply more lather as needed, if the hairs start to pull.
  7. Finish with a cold towel to close the pores.
  8. Apply Aveda After Shave.

The only way to get comfortable and fast at shaving is to practice as much as you can while in school. Before I shaved someone else, I shaved my arms and legs to get the feel for it. Knowing what angle and pressure to use is really important so as not to cut your client. But usually some people spot while getting a shave, so if that happens, just take the correct precautions. Always let your guest know if they are bleeding, because it’s nothing to hide. They will see it later anyway, and telling them helps build the trust they have for you as their barber.

Rebooking

As a good stylist, I try really hard to get my clients to rebook with me. Retaining clients can be a challenge sometimes, but the key is just practice. When you are with your client, pay close attention to what you say to them and what comes naturally to you. In the beginning of your service, you need to not only get to know your client’s hair but also pay attention to their personality.

Here are some good questions to ask to help learn what your clients expect from you as a service provider:

How was your last hair cut?

You can learn so much from this question. If they were happy, ask why? What was it that made that experience a good one? If they weren’t happy, find out why, and keep it in mind so that you don’t repeat the mistake of the last stylist.

How often do you come here to get your hair cut?

You will find out if they are a regular client or a once-and-a-while client. If they are a regular client ask about their last experience. They didn’t rebook with that last person, so it’s important to find out why.

If you find out your client does not come often, keep that in mind for later. You may wish to education your client on why it’s important for them to come in regularly.

What would you like to get from your experience today?

This is my favorite question because it lets your client know you care about their time and experience. It also helps you know more about your client and how you should provide for them.

The best advice I have been given is to be a good listener. Repeat everything back to your client, and make sure you’re both on the same page.

After you complete your service, tell them you want to see them in how ever many weeks. Usually they will rebook with you. You have their trust and they feel like you care about their well being.

Social Networking

In today’s world, social media is a great way to get your name out there. You can connect with other people in the beauty world, get up-to-date on fashion, and show your talents.

Why would you want to connect with other people in your industry? Because it’s not what you know, but who you know. Being well-connected is a great thing and surrounding yourself with positive people who share your interests can be really beneficial. You never know. Stay in contact with people you meet throughout your career, because you might connect with them later on in life.

For me, social media is important to keep up with new trends and with what’s hot right now. Being a stylist, my clients expect me to be current with what’s new. I should be aware so that I can keep their look up-to-date.

You can market yourself on social networks to showcase your talents to your family and friends. Keep your profiles open to the public and professional, not personal. Your page should market you as a professional hairdresser. You can be yourself, just an appropriate version of yourself. Let the world explore your page, and get access to information on how to book with you.

Future employers might run across your page. It’s very important to sell yourself in the most positive way possible.

Social media is an incredible opportunity to expand and market yourself to the best of your ability.

Aveda’s Product Line for Men

As a women, it was harder for me to recommend products for my male clients because I wasn’t using them personally. I didn’t know about the products’ hold, feel, or shine. But I did read all the products labels, and got to learn what they were for and how they would hold. Not being too familiar with the products, I would base my recommendations off the label.

But, over time, I got more comfortable with the products by actually using them. I tried the products on wet and dry hair, and on hair that starts wet and then is blow dried. By trying the product, you’re able to feel if there’s too much product in the hair or not enough. And don’t be afraid to experiment with a combination of products. Trying new products on your client is important to help achieve the different styles that the products can create. Showing your client new products each time they see you not only helps you sell retail, but it builds trust between you.

Most businessmen like to have hold with no shine—“the natural look.” I always recommend Grooming Cream. Grooming Cream can not only go on wet or dry, but it holds really well. Aveda Pomade is great for pompadours: great hold with a very nice shine to it. For men with normal hair types I recommend using Aveda’s Men’s Shampoo and Conditioner because it was made especially for men’s thick scalps.

Barbering vs. Cosmetology

As a cosmetologist who crosses over to barbering, I recommend getting licensed for both. Cosmetology gave me the fundamentals of hair cutting and shear work. I am confident in my color skills and can do amazing blow outs. Barbering put my skills to work by learning clipper cuts, straight razor shaves, and understanding shapes in a whole new way.

If you’re unsure about whether you want to do long hair, short hair, color, or cuts, I recommend starting in cosmetology and finding what you’re good at and what comes most naturally to you.

When I was in cosmetology, I disliked cutting men’s hair because it did not come naturally to me. I felt it was hard, and I was not good at it, so I tried my best to avoid men’s haircuts. But I did not want to be afraid of cutting short hair, so I decided to study barbering. I want to be a good hairstylist and, to me, you can never have enough education in this industry. New trends evolve every day and you are never going to stop learning outside of school.

Now that I understand short hair, I love it. I’m so glad I will be a dual-licensed hairdresser. I don’t think cosmetology is better than barbering or barbering is better than cosmetology. It’s a personal choice, but for me, having the knowledge of both, and the licenses for both, was a good decision.