Ayurveda Diet

Ayurveda Diet

Ayurveda, which originated in India in ancient times, is a traditional form of healthcare that uses holistic healing practices customized to each person which takes into account the need for nutrition, exercise, hygiene, social interaction, and other lifestyle elements. Ayurvedic theory uses the principal that everything in the universe is interconnected including mind, body, and spirit. And when we are in harmony with our environment, we’re able to keep a peaceful inner equilibrium. Aveda uses Ayurvedic theory to promote good health and keep the body in balance.

Each individual’s mind/body makeup can thrive in a particular environment. But when we are out of harmony with our environment, the body can suffer. As humans, we are constantly affected by everything around us including sights, tastes, smells, and things we hear. All the energy transfers we encounter can wear out the body. Ayurveda tries to prevent illness by using natural forms of medicine derived from plants, minerals, and roots to restore the body’s delicate balance through detoxifying, energizing, or soothing the individual.

Interestingly, there is even an Ayurvedic diet. Everyone has different needs but a basic introduction to an Ayurvedic diet isn’t what you might think—it’s not just beans, vegetables, and grains. It can be applied to any diet.

The saying “you are what you eat” is literally true, especially because what we eat affects our emotions. Our digestion is sensitive and, when we eat things that don’t agree with us, it upsets the stomach leading to an uncomfortable feeling. Bad digestion can be upsetting both physically and psychologically.

Ayurveda recognizes six tastes and it’s important to have all six of these tastes in your diet every day to contribute to feeling satisfied at the end of your meal. The six tastes are:

  1. sweet (sugar, honey, rice, pasta)
  2. sour (lemons, hard cheese, plain yogurt)
  3. salty (salt, cured meats, anything salty)
  4. pungent (chili peppers, ginger, hot spices)
  5. bitter (leafy greens, turmeric)
  6. astringent (pomegranate, green apples, cauliflower)

These are listed in the order they are digested by your body. Sweet gets digested first. So it’s a bad idea to have dessert at the end of the meal. It’s better to put it at the beginning. Salad, on the other hand, is good near the end of the meal.

The Ayurveda diet uses a holistic approach to caring for your digestion. You can learn how and what to use in order to apply Ayurvedic remedies into a balanced lifestyle by taking a Dosha Quiz. Good luck on your journey to balanced health!